Special Diet - Created Date : 23.10.2019

Hey friends! Super excited to share today’s recipe – Paleo Gluten-Free...

Hey friends! Super excited to share today’s recipe – Paleo Gluten-Free...



Hey friends! Super excited to share today’s recipe – Paleo Gluten-Free Har Gow Dumpling Wrappers! Some people also called them crystal dumpling wrappers. Still not quite sure what they are? They are a type of dumpling wrappers that turn translucent color after steamed so you can see through the dumpling fillings with all the gorgeous colors inside crystal clear. Fun?

Hong Kongese Dim Sum is probably one of my favorite Chinese foods. Each juicy mini dumpling morsels are burst with flavor and they come with a wide variety of choices. The most famous ones are probably dim sum shumai and Har Gow dumplings (Prawn dumplings). And today I’m showing you how to make har gow dumpling wrappers gluten-free and Paleo friendly!

Tips on making har gow dumpling wrappers

It’s important to keep the dough at perfect moisture level – not too wet and not too dry or the dough will tear. If the dough is too wet, it’s hard to form wrappers. If it’s too dry, the wrapper will tear and crack. You’ll also want to keep the dough warm and moist at all time so cover it with a cling wrap at all time.

The dough is the easiest to work with right after it’s formed so you’ll want to assemble the dumplings right away. These har gow dumpling wrappers do not store well in the fridge and freezer.

I also recommend that you start by making the har gow or crystal dumpling fillings first then come back to this recipe to make the wrappers. The dumpling fillings can be made a day in advance so do the fillings first then the wrappers the following day, it’ll save you a lot of time assembling these mini juicy morsels.

How to make Paleo Gluten-Free Har Gow Dumpling Wrappers

To make Paleo gluten-free har gow wrappers with no wheat starch and grain-free. You’ll need –

The ingredients are very simple and straightforward. However I recommend you read through the entire recipe before you begin.

First time making Har Gow dumpling wrappers? Read this.

Pay attention to the timing, temperature, and moisture level of the dough. As you form the dough, it should feel warm and moist to your hands. The dough should has some elasticity. If it feels too wet, dust with a bit more potato starch. If it feels too dry, add ½ tsp oil or hot water a time. The dough should have the consistency of a soft modeling clay.

Cover the dough with a cling wrap and keep it warm and moist at all time as you work on the wrappers. The har gow dumpling wrappers aren’t the easiest to make but once you get a hang of it the process is quite straightforward.

Tip: Find a few family members or friends to help you make the wrappers and assemble the dumplings! Think the factory assembly line – 2 people make the wrappers and 2 people assemble the dumplings right away. It’s the best way to make the dumplings quickly and a fun activity with the family!

If you give these Paleo Gluten-Free Har Gow Dumpling Wrappers and Paleo Har Gow Dumplings a try, be sure to leave a comment and rate the recipe below. It’ll help me and my blog tremendously. Thanks so much in advance! Now go have fun and enjoy! :))

Tools:

Instructions

Before you begin, I recommend that you make the har gow dumpling fillings first then the wrappers. Please read through the entire recipe before you begin. it’s important to keep the dough moist (not too wet or too dry) and to keep it in warm temperature. You’ll want to work quickly to form the wrappers and keep the wrappers moist at all time.

In a large mixing bowl, combine sweet potato or potato starch, tapioca starch, and salt.

Bring 1 cup of water to boil. We will only use about ¾ cup hot water.

Slowly add hot boiling water 1-2 tbsp a time (up to ¾ cup) to the mixing bowl while stirring so the starch mixture quickly turns into a translucent dough.

Add 1 tsp avocado oil and continue to stir. While the dough is still hot but “cool” enough to handle, knead the dough for a couple of minutes until it turns into a white and smooth dough ball, about 1-2 minutes.

The dough should feel moist to your hands and has some elasticity. If it looks too wet, dust with a bit more potato starch. If it looks too dry, add ½ tsp oil or hot water a time. The dough should have the consistency of soft modeling clay.

Cover the dough with a Cling wrap to keep it moist and warm as you work on the wrappers.

Dust the kitchen counter and rolling pin with starch. Take a small dough weight around 1 oz. and roll it into a ball. Press/flatten it with your palm then roll it into a thin wrap (about 1/16-inch thin) with a rolling pin.

Use a cookie cutter to cut-out uniformed round shape dumpling wrappers. Carefully use a butter knife to scrape the wrapper away from the kitchen counter.

Place the wrapper over a non-stick surface and cover it with a cling wrap to keep it moist as you work on the rest of dough. Repeat the process. You should have roughly 24 (3 ¼ inch diameter) dumpling wrappers.

Video

Notes

t’s important to keep the dough at perfect moisture level - not too wet and not too dry or the dough will tear. The dough is the easiest to work with right after it’s made so you’ll want to form the dumpling wrappers and assemble the dumplings right away.

The exact starch to hot water and oil ratio will depend on your local temperature and humidity level so use the recipe as a base point and do small incremental adjustments to form a soft and pliable dough.



Microwave cooking and nutrition

Are microwaves bad for your health? Almost every American house has a microwave. The convenience they offer is undeniable. However, despite the widespread use of microwave ovens and excellent safety recordings, some people suspect that cooking microwaved food makes it somewhat less healthy by removing foods from eating. Do you cook with microwave? Are microwave foods healthy?

How does microwave cooking work?

Understanding how microwave ovens work can help clarify the answers to these general questions. Microwave ovens cook food similar to radio waves but using shorter energy waves. These waves are highly selective, mainly affecting water and other electrically asymmetrical molecules - one end is positively charged and the other is negatively charged. Microwave ovens cause these molecules to vibrate and rapidly generate thermal (heat) energy.

Are microwaves safe to cook?

Some foods, when they are exposed to heat, from a microwave oven or a normal oven, are broken down. Vitamin C is perhaps the most clear example. However, since microwave cooking times are shorter, cooking with microwave does a better job of preserving vitamin C and other nutrients that are decomposed when heated.

When going to the vegetables, cooking in water takes some of the nutritional values ??because the nutrients flow into the cooking water. For example, boiled broccoli loses glycosinolate, a sulfur-containing compound that can give vegetables the ability to fight against cancer (and many find it distinctive and some find it disgusting). Steaming vegetables - even steaming microwave - is it better? In some ways, yes. For example, steamed broccoli holds more glucosinolate than boiled or fried broccoli.

Are microwaves bad for your health?

The method of cooking, which keeps the nutrients in the best way, is a method that quickly heats, warms food and uses as little liquid as possible. The microwave meets these criteria. Using the microwave with a small amount of water evaporates food from the inside out. It contains more vitamins and minerals than almost all other cooking methods and shows that microwave foods can be really healthy.

But let's not get lost in details. Vegetables are good for you in any way you prepare, and most of us don't eat enough. Is the microwave oven good or bad? Microwave is an engineering wonder, a miracle of convenience - and sometimes advantageous in feeding.

Learn more about safe microwave cooking. See. "Microwave food in plastic: Is it dangerous or not?"


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