Special Diet - Created Date : 28.8.2019

Mexican Street Corn Salsa

Mexican Street Corn Salsa



Mexican Street Corn Salsa

Depending on where you live, have traveled, and are aware of, you may have NO idea of what I am talking about when I say Mexican street corn. (If so, you are missing out, but don’t worry, you will be in-the-know shortly!). But oh, those of you that do know what that is, probably know all about the magic of this simple street food. It is my inspiration for this Mexican Street Corn Salsa.

Mexican street corn is typically a roasted ear of corn (husk still on for better grip!) that is slathered in mayo with chili powder and cotija cheese (although there are variations, of course). My first experience with Mexican street corn was on a family vacation to Santa Fe not too long ago. I had seen and heard about this treat but had not come across an “authentic” source. So I was extremely excited when I found a Mexican street corn stand at a market in Santa Fe!

I am also a huge salsa freak, primarily for the chunky fresh types such as my Pico de Gallo, and this was a natural step to make a salsa out of the street corn. I was a little worried about the cheese at first (I LOVE cheese, so that was not the problem, you just don’t see chunks of it in salsa very often) but the softness and mildness of the cotija did not overpower the other flavors at all. Success!!!

I have been using the amazing flavors of this Mexican Street Corn Salsa in different recipes. Check them out here!From enchiladas to frittatas and tacos, there are so many tasty options!

This Mexican Street Corn Salsa is best the same day you make it as it starts to dry out over time, but you can freshen it back up with some more lime juice or a little water. Even though I use this primarily as a salsa for dipping, it is also great as a topper for any other Mexican dish: fajitas, tacos, enchiladas, etc. I love adding fresh ingredients like this to brighten up what can be heavy Mexican food. That is, if there is any left over ??

Mexican Street Corn Salsa

Print Recipe

Servings

Prep Time

2cups

5minutes

Passive Time

30minutes

Servings

Prep Time

2cups

5minutes

Passive Time

30minutes

Mexican Street Corn Salsa

Print Recipe

Servings

Prep Time

2cups

5minutes

Passive Time

30minutes

Servings

Prep Time

2cups

5minutes

Passive Time

30minutes

Ingredients

1 1/2cupscorn

1jalapeno

1/2tspchili powder

1/2tspsalt

1/2lime

2Tbspfresh cilantrochopped

2ozcotija cheese

Servings: cups

Instructions

Finely dice the jalapeno pepper. Remove the ribs and seeds for a mild heat or keep them in for more of a kick.

Add all of the ingredients to a small bowl and mix. Season to taste as needed. Refrigerate until chilled, approximately 30 minutes. This salsa is best the same day as the corn tends to dry out if made too far in advance. You can correct this by adding more lime or a little water to freshen it up again.

Comments

Mexican street corn is the best! I live in Mexico, and every evening the elotero, or corn vendor, comes around. You can just step outside and buy a yummy cob of corn, slathered in mayo and covered with sprinkly cheese, lots of lime juice and enough chili powder to make it turn red. Delicious!!!!!

Who can resist this? It looks both like a comfort food and a refreshing salad. Awesome. I’ve never heard of cotija cheese though (I don’t think it’s available here actually) so maybe sub another kind. Can’t wait to try!

We have a tamale lady in the neighborhood, but I usually only see corn vendors at theme parks or after big events release in LA. As a HUGE fan of corn salsa, I think I’ll have to give this a try. Thanks for sharing!

Welcome!

Welcome! My name is Kim and I love to combine different flavor and recipe ideas into one for something new and exciting!

You will also find some travel and lifestyle ideas here, typically surrounding food! Read More…



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Understanding how microwave ovens work can help clarify the answers to these general questions. Microwave ovens cook food similar to radio waves but using shorter energy waves. These waves are highly selective, mainly affecting water and other electrically asymmetrical molecules - one end is positively charged and the other is negatively charged. Microwave ovens cause these molecules to vibrate and rapidly generate thermal (heat) energy.

Are microwaves safe to cook?

Some foods, when they are exposed to heat, from a microwave oven or a normal oven, are broken down. Vitamin C is perhaps the most clear example. However, since microwave cooking times are shorter, cooking with microwave does a better job of preserving vitamin C and other nutrients that are decomposed when heated.

When going to the vegetables, cooking in water takes some of the nutritional values ??because the nutrients flow into the cooking water. For example, boiled broccoli loses glycosinolate, a sulfur-containing compound that can give vegetables the ability to fight against cancer (and many find it distinctive and some find it disgusting). Steaming vegetables - even steaming microwave - is it better? In some ways, yes. For example, steamed broccoli holds more glucosinolate than boiled or fried broccoli.

Are microwaves bad for your health?

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Learn more about safe microwave cooking. See. "Microwave food in plastic: Is it dangerous or not?"


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