Special Diet - Created Date : 14.10.2019

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Thai Chicken & Sweet Potato Noodle Bowls

These Thai Chicken & Sweet Potato Noodles Bowls are a delicious way to give into your Thai craving while staying low-carb. Spiralized sweet potato “noodles” take the place of rice noodles, and are covered in a spicy satay-like sauce. Add in some fresh veggies and tender chicken, and you have a perfect meal for any night of the week!

You guys I’m back! I realize it’s been a while since I’ve last posted a recipe (umm… March, anyone?), but man… a lot has been going on. We officially finished our 2016/2017 homeschool year (hooray!), the girls have been taking taekwondo, Kylie has been singing on the worship team at our church, VBS came and went, and I just returned on June 11th from the Gluten-Free Blogger Retreat in Portland, OR.

The retreat was a blast! Finally, after blogging 7-8 years, I got to meet 9 of the gluten-free bloggers I’ve come to know online and love. We all support each other and share each other’s recipes… All in all, it’s just an awesome group of women focused on learning from each other and building each other up. It was a great time.

We also went to the PSU (Portland State University) Farmer’s Market. I’ve never seen so many gorgeous, fresh flowers and various produce. I’m a little envious, really… we certainly don’t have anything of that caliber up here in Alaska.

We toured Bob’s Red Mill and I got to meet THE Bob. Yes, he really is totally and completely real. And was very gracious, talkative, and friendly. ??

The night I was headed home from Portland, my 12 year old found a recipe in Cooking Light Magazine for Thai Sweet Potato Noodle Bowls. She actually made it for dinner (super proud mom here), and it was good (I sampled leftovers), but the recipe overall was pretty salty and needed some flavor tweaks. So that’s what I did, adapted the recipe to make it my own — and it’s really, really delicious!

These vibrant Thai Chicken & Sweet Potato Noodles Bowls are filled with flavor. The creamy satay-like sauce is a little spicy, the lime adds a bit of sour, while the cashews add a crunchy element.

Normally when I make a curry, I use some sweetener to balance out the flavors, but there’s no sugar or sweetener added in this recipe. The sweet potatoes have enough natural sweetness none is needed.

I own this spiralizer, and I recommend using the smaller noodle blade instead of the larger one.

You can absolutely swap out the chicken for another protein if you prefer, shrimp would be great, so would tofu for any of my vegan readers.

Also, this recipe calls for almond butter, but you could probably use cashew butter or peanut butter if you needed to (for allergy reasons) or wanted to. Just know I haven’t tried either in this particular recipe. ??

Add the water to the pan, cover, and cook for another 2 minutes (do not remove the lid during this time, you are steaming the noodles).

Remove the lid (you won’t need it again), and carefully add the baby spinach (you may need to add half, then stir, then add the remaining half to prevent spillage).

When the baby spinach is mostly wilted, add the diced cooked chicken, and the sauce. Carefully toss all of the ingredients together. When everything is just combined, remove from heat and serve.

Garnish with lime wedges and chopped cashews.

Recipe Notes from Megan

Not all curry pastes are created equal. Some are spicier than others, some aren't as "pure" as others. I definitely recommend the Mae Ploy brand.

I use this spiralizer, and I recommend using the smaller noodle blade instead of the larger one.

You can absolutely swap out the chicken for another protein if you prefer, shrimp would be great, so would tofu for any of my vegan readers (or just omit it altogether). Also for my vegan readers, you can omit the fish sauce -- just compensate with sea salt to taste.

This recipe calls for almond butter, but you could probably use cashew butter or peanut butter if you needed to (for allergy reasons) or wanted to. Just know I haven't tried either in this particular recipe.

3.5.3226

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Megan, this is a stellar bowl! Sautéed sweet potato noodles are the bomb … and even more so with all these goodies piled on top. Loved the pic of you with Bob … the mill is such fun Portland pit stop. I remember spying a 25 pound bag of GF chocolate cake mix and ALMOST packed that baby home ??

Hey you were in my neck of the Woods! Yes I love Bob’s! I lugged home a 25 lb bag of 1 to 1 GF flour so I need you to come up with a ton of recipes for me to use it up with …that are also dairy free….???

This recipe looks great, will give it a Go! Could you please list all the sites for your GF bloggers?

Thanks!



Microwave cooking and nutrition

Are microwaves bad for your health? Almost every American house has a microwave. The convenience they offer is undeniable. However, despite the widespread use of microwave ovens and excellent safety recordings, some people suspect that cooking microwaved food makes it somewhat less healthy by removing foods from eating. Do you cook with microwave? Are microwave foods healthy?

How does microwave cooking work?

Understanding how microwave ovens work can help clarify the answers to these general questions. Microwave ovens cook food similar to radio waves but using shorter energy waves. These waves are highly selective, mainly affecting water and other electrically asymmetrical molecules - one end is positively charged and the other is negatively charged. Microwave ovens cause these molecules to vibrate and rapidly generate thermal (heat) energy.

Are microwaves safe to cook?

Some foods, when they are exposed to heat, from a microwave oven or a normal oven, are broken down. Vitamin C is perhaps the most clear example. However, since microwave cooking times are shorter, cooking with microwave does a better job of preserving vitamin C and other nutrients that are decomposed when heated.

When going to the vegetables, cooking in water takes some of the nutritional values ??because the nutrients flow into the cooking water. For example, boiled broccoli loses glycosinolate, a sulfur-containing compound that can give vegetables the ability to fight against cancer (and many find it distinctive and some find it disgusting). Steaming vegetables - even steaming microwave - is it better? In some ways, yes. For example, steamed broccoli holds more glucosinolate than boiled or fried broccoli.

Are microwaves bad for your health?

The method of cooking, which keeps the nutrients in the best way, is a method that quickly heats, warms food and uses as little liquid as possible. The microwave meets these criteria. Using the microwave with a small amount of water evaporates food from the inside out. It contains more vitamins and minerals than almost all other cooking methods and shows that microwave foods can be really healthy.

But let's not get lost in details. Vegetables are good for you in any way you prepare, and most of us don't eat enough. Is the microwave oven good or bad? Microwave is an engineering wonder, a miracle of convenience - and sometimes advantageous in feeding.

Learn more about safe microwave cooking. See. "Microwave food in plastic: Is it dangerous or not?"


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