Special Diet - Created Date : 27.8.2019

Roasted Acorn Squash Crostini with Crispy Prosciutto and Goat Cheese

Roasted Acorn Squash Crostini with Crispy Prosciutto and Goat Cheese



Roasted Acorn Squash Crostini with Crispy Prosciutto and Goat Cheese

This Roasted Acorn Squash Crostini with Crispy Prosciutto and Goat Cheese is one delicious two (maybe three) bite app! Acorn squash is diced and roasted until golden brown and slightly caramelized. A generous spread of creamy goat cheese is the base and crispy prosciutto and walnuts give some delicious flavour and texture. Perfect for upcoming holiday parties!

Hey guys! How was your weekend? If you guys follow me on Instagram, you may have noticed that hubby and I were in Montreal. Boy oh boy, did we eat well! We had a little trip to celebrate our anniversary, which is actually today! We’ve been married for 13 years (and been together for 22 !!) It’s been a blast so far and looking forward to the next 22 years making memories with my BFF.

I remember the day we got married. It was lovely fall day, but unbelievably cold. We grew up in a small town in rural Newfoundland by the Atlantic ocean and wanted to get some wedding pics on the shoreline with the rugged rocks and the ocean in the background. We froze our buns off, but the pictures were lovely. It was worth it for the pics, lol ??

What are Newfoundland Dogberries?

You may be wondering what type of berries are in my pics. They are dogberries that grow on the dogberry tree. These trees are quite popular in Newfoundland and can be found all throughout the Province this time of year. Dogberries are hard to miss because of their beautiful red colour. At our wedding ceremony we had some around for decoration, along with pumpkins and the like – it was definitely a fall wedding.

The colour of these berries is so vibrant, I couldn’t resist using them in my pics for this fall inspired crostini! After that, I made a lovely centrepiece for my kitchen table….that is as crafty as I get, lol ??

Some people make jams or wine from the berries, but I would not recommend eating them raw. However, my father did. The day that I made these Roasted Acorn Squash Crostini, my parents popped by. I wanted them to try the crostini. I had my back turned for .5 seconds and dad had eaten a dogberry.

‘Hmmmm……whatever that was, it was really hard….kinda spicy.’

Mom and I looked at each other, wide eyed.

‘Dad, they aren’t for eating!’

Jokingly, he said his tongue was getting numb.

In all seriousness, though, I don’t think it’s a bad thing to eat dogberries, it’s just not recommended. They are quite bitter raw (as dad found out the hard way).

They say (whoever they are) that if dogberries are plentiful this time of year, then the winter will be rough (aka a lot of snow). And we have a lot of dogberries this year. A lot. Beautiful to look at but, please, no snow!!

Roasted Acorn Squash Crostini

Like most crostini, these are pretty easy to assemble (and even easier to eat).

Prosciutto is crisped in the oven and acorn squash is roasted for about 15 minutes until golden brown. The squash is diced in small pieces so it doesn’t take long to cook through. Before roasting, I tossed with Herbes de Provence. I use this quite often (especially for roasted potatoes). You can usually find it in the grocery store where you would find other herbs. Herbes de Provence is basically a mixture of herbs, typically thyme, lavender, rosemary and oregano. If you don’t have this on hand, you can use a pinch of each of these herbs or even just thyme would work lovely.

After the bread is golden brown and crisp, top with a generous spread of goat cheese, roasted acorn squash and the rest of your ingredients. A drizzle of balsamic reduction adds a lovely touch. I sprinkled with fresh parley as the colour contrasted nicely, but that is totally optional

These crostini are best enjoyed right away, but I’m sure that won’t be a problem!

Crostinis are one of my favourite things to eat and perfect for this time of year when entertaining. If you want to some more awesome recipes, check out my Roasted Strawberry Crostini and Chanterelle Mushroom Crostini. Bread, good cheese and some quality toppings – there is no going wrong, am I right?

Before I go, I want to give a shout out to Annie from New York as the winner drawn for the copy of More Than Poutine on my giveaway! Enjoy Annie!

I hope to share more about our trip to Montreal on my next monthly faves….stay tuned! Until next time, take care and chit chat again soon ??

Roasted Acorn Squash Crostini with Crispy Prosciutto and Goat Cheese

This Roasted Acorn Squash Crostini with Crispy Prosciutto and Goat Cheese is one delicious two (maybe three) bite app! Acorn squash is diced and roasted until golden brown and slightly caramelized. A generous spread of creamy goat cheese is the base and crispy prosciutto and walnuts give some delicious flavour and texture. Perfect for upcoming holiday parties!

Notes

You can find balsamic reduction in the vinegar section of your supermarket or you can make your own. To make your own balsamic reduction, mix 1/4 cup of balsamic vinegar with 1 tbsp. of maple syrup in a heavy bottomed sauce pan on low heat for 12-15 minutes until reduced slightly and mixture coats the back of a spoon.

I absolutely love baked squash. This recipe sounds like a blast! I love it. I love all the flavors you combined here – the prosciutto and the goat cheese. Oh man, I can’t wait to make this. Saving. and sharing.



5 Amazing Online Cooking Taught You All The Skills You Need

1. Savory.tv

Savory.tv carries a fist. It is based on the noble mission of helping viewers create restaurant-quality dishes in their own homes, because all content is created by professional chefs. In addition to the fun videos placed directly on the site, it also has recipes, tips, global food trivia, and little-known food facts. Find recipes easily by using the search box or by clicking one of the many recipe categories listed on the right side of the site. They also have a fun "Ask to Chef" feature, a blog chock full of beer and wine pairing suggestions and food, and many resources like how to find a sustainable farm near you. This video shows the preparation of the classic Butter Chicken recipe made at the Sahara Restaurant in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.

2. The New York Times Food Videos

Do you turn your mouth into the New York Times food section just to irrigate seasonal recipes created by culinary coffees such as Mark Bittman? I did it too. The recipes are helping, but I would like to see how a professional chef is following them to get tips on everything from knife masters to food and beverage pairings. The New York Times Food Videos section does all of the recipes that they publish, as well as clips of great food news, trends, and discoveries, as well as an easy-to-navigate interface. Melissa Clark recently took us to her kitchen to show us how Satan prepared the Cooking Cake.

3. Everyday Food With Sarah Carey

Sometimes I enter the local market without a list and my mind is literally emptying. I see all these great food and I don't know what to do with it. Sarah Carey is our guide to take daily items from the market and turn them into healthy, cheap, fast and easy to prepare meals for ourselves and the whole family. The show features every Everyday Food, easy breeze style and infectious laughter that makes the show as fun as it helps. In this video Sarah offers us an easy, delicious and economical green juice recipe.

4. FudeHouse

Jeffrey de Picciotto is the real issue when it comes to pursuing food passion. He started as a trainee at New York's Dickson's Farmstand Meats and worked in the upcountry. The multicultural background and the experience he lived as a creative director and chef, FudeHouse met on site, filled with videos to teach you how to cook from the heart and soul instead. Would you like to know how to tie up turkey, make pork sandwiches with meat, grate ginger easily, or take out the perfect pizza crust? Jeffrey has helped you with tips, advice, recipes, techniques and encouragement. I think I fell in love. In this video, Jeffrey shows us how to make the restaurant-quality steak at home.

5. Sorted Food

They all laugh, make food and share in a British accent! This is the recipe for success for SORTED Food, an online cooking program funded by five chefs who offer the lighter side of cooking with equal piece of knowledge and fun. From the three-part series in chocolate to how to make sushi rolling, these blocks share everything they know about food and live a happy life inside and outside the kitchen. If you go directly to their YouTube channels, they also share their favorite online dining programs ranging from sweet Lovely Lady Pastries to Nicko's Kitchen. With their signature humor and impressive accents, they show us how to prepare a spectacular, highly satisfying Thai Noodle Broth.


  • SHARE :